Bookmark and Share
Previous article

News Articles

  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948
  • 31/10/2016 Make a Comment
  • Contributed by: Jason ( 2 articles in 2016 )
Click to receive your Free Guide
Be Grateful Today!
Article 1 Right to Equality
Article 2 Freedom from Discrimination
Article 3 Right to Life, Liberty, Personal Security
Article 4 Freedom from Slavery
Article 5 Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment
Article 6 Right to Recognition as a Person before the Law
Article 7 Right to Equality before the Law
Article 8 Right to Remedy by Competent Tribunal
Article 9 Freedom from Arbitrary Arrest and Exile
Article 10 Right to Fair Public Hearing
Article 11 Right to be Considered Innocent until Proven Guilty
Article 12 Freedom from Interference with Privacy, Family, Home and Correspondence
Article 13 Right to Free Movement in and out of the Country
Article 14 Right to Asylum in other Countries from Persecution
Article 15 Right to a Nationality and the Freedom to Change It
Article 16 Right to Marriage and Family
Article 17 Right to Own Property
Article 18 Freedom of Belief and Religion
Article 19 Freedom of Opinion and Information
Article 20 Right of Peaceful Assembly and Association
Article 21 Right to Participate in Government and in Free Elections
Article 22 Right to Social Security
Article 23 Right to Desirable Work and to Join Trade Unions
Article 24 Right to Rest and Leisure
Article 25 Right to Adequate Living Standard
Article 26 Right to Education
Article 27 Right to Participate in the Cultural Life of Community
Article 28 Right to a Social Order that Articulates this Document
Article 29 Community Duties Essential to Free and Full Development
Article 30 Freedom from State or Personal Interference in the above Rights

View full PDF

Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Adopted and proclaimed by General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948

On December 10, 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights the full text of which appears in the following pages. Following this historic act the Assembly called upon all Member countries to publicise the text of the Declaration and "to cause it to be disseminated, displayed, read and expounded principally in schools and other educational institutions, without distinction based on the political status of countries or territories."

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 General Assembly resolution 217 A as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into almost 500 languages.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
What is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Universal Declaration) is an international document that states basic rights and fundamental freedoms to which all human beings are entitled.

When was the Universal Declaration created?

The Universal Declaration was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 10 December 1948. Motivated by the experiences of the preceding world wars, the Universal Declaration was the first time that countries agreed on a comprehensive statement of inalienable human rights.

Australia played an important role in the development of the Universal Declaration. Click here to find out more.

What does the Universal Declaration say?

The Universal Declaration begins by recognising that ‘the inherent dignity of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world’.

It declares that human rights are universal – to be enjoyed by all people, no matter who they are or where they live.

The Universal Declaration includes civil and political rights, like the right to life, liberty, free speech and privacy. It also includes economic, social and cultural rights, like the right to social security, health and education.

Read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Is the Universal Declaration legally binding?

The Universal Declaration is not a treaty, so it does not directly create legal obligations for countries.

However, it is an expression of the fundamental values which are shared by all members of the international community. And it has had a profound influence on the development of international human rights law. Some argue that because countries have consistently invoked the Declaration for more than sixty years, it has become binding as a part of customary international law.

Further, the Universal Declaration has given rise to a range of other international agreements which are legally binding on the countries that ratify them. These include

the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and
the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).
For more information on these treaties, see

Human rights: right by right

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)

(Entry: 1976)
Right to self-determination (ICCPR Article 1)
Rights to equality and non-discrimination (ICCPR Article 2.1, 26; ICESCR Article 2.1; CERD; CEDAW; CAT; CROC; CRPD)
Human rights and non-citizens (ICCPR Articles 2.1, 13)
Legislative and other measures for implementation (ICCPR Article 2.2; ICESCR Article 2.1; CERD; CEDAW; CAT; CROC; CRPD)
Right to an effective remedy (ICCPR Article 2.3)
Permissible limitations on rights
Equal rights of men and women (ICCPR Article 3; ICESCR Article 3; CEDAW)
Derogation from rights in emergencies (ICCPR Article 4)
Non-diminution of rights (ICCPR Article 5; ICESCR Article 5)
Right to life (ICCPR Article 6)
Freedom from torture or cruel, degrading or inhuman treatment or punishment (ICCPR Article 7; CAT)
Freedom from slavery and forced labour (ICCPR Article 8)
Security of the person and freedom from arbitrary detention (ICCPR Article 9)
Right to humane treatment in detention (ICCPR Article 10)
Prohibition on imprisonment for inability to fulfil a contract (ICCPR Article 11)
Right to freedom of movement (ICCPR Article 12)
Fair trial and fair hearing rights (ICCPR Article 14.1)
Minimum guarantees in criminal proceedings (ICCPR Articles 14.2 - 14.7)
Prohibition on retrospective criminal laws (ICCPR Article 15)
Right to recognition as a person (ICCPR Article 16; CRPD Article 12)
Freedom from interference with privacy, family, home or reputation (ICCPR Article 17)
Freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief (ICCPR Article 18)
Freedom of information, opinion and expression (ICCPR Article 19)
Prohibiition of advocacy of national, racial or religious hatred (ICCPR Article 20; CERD Article 4)
Freedom of assembly (ICCPR Article 21)
Freedom of association (ICCPR Article 22; ICESCR Article 8)
Right to respect for the family (ICCPR Article 23.1)
Right to marry and found a family (ICCPR Article 23.2)
Rights of parents and children (ICCPR Article 24; CRC)
Right to name and nationality (ICCPR Article 24; CERD; CEDAW; CRC; CRPD)
Right to take part in public affairs, voting rights and access to public service (ICCPR Article 25)
Rights of members of ethnic, linguistic and religious minorities (ICCPR Article 27)

https://www.humanrights.gov.au/rights-and-freedoms-right-right-0

ICESCR - International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
CERD - International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial
CEDAW - Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women
CAT - Committee against Torture
CROC - Convention on the Rights of the Child
CRPD - Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Human Rights Explained: The International Bill of Rights.

What is known as the International Bill of Human Rights is made up of:

Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)
International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966)
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966)
Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Other binding agreements which expand on the rights contained in the Universal Declaration include:

the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination 1965
the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women 1979
the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment 1984
the Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989
the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2006

https://www.humanrights.gov.au/publications/what-universal-declaration-human-rights

Source: https://hrlibrary.umn.edu/edumat/hreduseries/hereandnow/Part-5/8_udhr-abbr.htm


     6+2= 
    (Note: If wrong - comments will not be posted)
    Footnotes:

    1Will not be visible to public.
    2Receive notification of other comments posted for this article. To cease notification after having posted click here.
    3To make a link clickable in the comments box enclose in link tags - ie.<link>Link</link>.

    To further have your say, head to our forum Click Here

    To contribute a news article Click Here

    To view or contribute a Quote Click Here

    Hosting & Support by WebPal© 2019 f4joz.com All rights reserved.